Pelvic PT highly rated in new IC Guidelines

The American Urological Association (AUA) released a new update to their 2011 Guideline on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome (IC/BPS). The original guidelines included research studies up through 2009. This new revision includes research studies through 2013. Read the amended guidelines here!

“Although the science relevant to IC/BPS is continually improving and evolving, it is still a challenging and complicated condition to diagnose and treat,” said Philip Hanno, MD, who chaired the multi-disciplinary Panel that developed and updated the Guideline. “…this Guideline is fully aligned to the latest science and provides physicians with a relevant blueprint to treating patients.”

Developed as a treatment guide and planning tool, the 2011 guidelines introduced a six step treatment plan. Newly diagnosed patients generally begin with strategies outlined in Step One and then, if those strategies do not bring symptom relief, are advised to try Step Two treatments and so forth. The treatments are classified within the steps based upon their risk of adverse events and/or if the treatment is reversible. Surgery, for example, would never be used as a first line intervention because it is irreversible and could cause very serious complications. Rather, surgery is listed as a Step Six treatment and would only be considered after the patient has tried and failed the therapies listed in Step One Through Step Five.

Two Key Changes

Comprehensive Physical Therapy Encouraged

In Step Two, Pelvic Physical Therapy was suggested for patients who present with pelvic floor tenderness with the highest review possible, Grade A. It states:

Appropriate manual physical therapy techniques (e.g., maneuvers that resolve pelvic, abdominal and/or hip muscular trigger points, lengthen muscle contractures, and release painful scars and other connective tissue restrictions), if appropriately-trained clinicians are available, should be offered to patients who present with pelvic floor tenderness. Pelvic floor strengthening exercises (e.g., Kegel exercises) should be avoided. Standard (Evidence Strength Grade A).

Botox Therapy Rating Improved!

Botox A was reclassified from Step Five to Step Four. New research emerged which showed that using BotoxA at a lower dosage, (from 200u to 100u) substantially reduced the risk of a troublesome complication, the need for self-catheterization. If a Botox treatment silences the nerves which control urination, a patient may be forced to self- catheterize until the effect wears off, often for months. One criteria for the use of Botox is the ability of a patient to self-catheterize if necessary. If a patient is unable to do so, this therapy is not recommended. The guidelines state:

Intradetrusor botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) may be administered if other treatments have not provided adequate symptom control and quality of life or if the clinician and patient agree that symptoms require this approach. Patients must be willing to accept the possibility that post-treatment intermittent self- catheterization may be necessary. Option (Evidence Strength- C)

Learn more about IC Treatments, including all treatment options in the AUA Guidelines here!

2 Responses

  1. This is really a breakthrough in the world of Physical Therapy – a Physical Therapist specialized in the treatment of Pelvic problems. It really pays to have this kind of specialization to rule out predisposing diagnosis concerning back problems especially if it talks more about kidney/bladder problems.

    1. Thank you for your comment. You are awesome! Many chronic lower back and hip dysfunctions have roots in the pelvic floor. I would be happy to help you treat/give guidance to your patients who may present with symptoms and can be reached at ehecht@emhpt.com.

Leave a reply