fbpx

Onward and Upward: Pilates Guillotine Tower

As many of you know, we recently moved up to the 9th floor to offer our patients larger treatment rooms and a tranquil, glass enclosed exercise space. In this blog, we’d like to introduce you to the latest and greatest addition to our gym, the newly acquired Pilates Tower, known by Pilates gurus as “The Guillotine”.  While the name “Guillotine Tower” may send shudders down the spine, evoking images of the historic reign of terror, the Pilates version is actually an easy-to-use, patient friendly, device designed to develop mobility, stability and strength of the hips, pelvis and spine. At EMH, we have taken “The Guillotine” to the next level, adapting basic exercises and stretches to treat the pelvic floor muscles.

 

Pilates Tower

 

Guillotine Tower Benefits:

 

  • Provides incredible feedback: which makes it a great assessment tool for stability, flexibility and articulation. Patients  can easily see when they are out of alignment or overusing a dominant side because the sliding bar will move in a jerky, uneven pattern.  When the bar glides smoothly and silently,  you know you have perfected the movement.
  • Offers  accessibility: The vertical slider allows patients with limited hamstring and lower-back flexibility (you know who you are!) to experience the full benefits of stretching and strengthening exercises.
  • Supplies versatility: Spring attachments of varying tensions can be used to create assistance or increase resistance modifying exercises for all levels in both upper and lower body exercises.
  • Targets the pelvic floor: A combination of common Pilates exercises and general pelvic floor exercises have been adapted by our expert physical therapists to address overactive or weak pelvic floor muscles that may be contributing to your specific diagnosis.

 

Pilates Tower Bar Lift Pilates Tower leg and core workout

Our Therapists Working with Pilates Tower Pilates Tower Leg Lifts

Pilates Tower Bar LIft One Leg Pilates Tower Bar Lift Two Legs

Pilates Tower Flying Back Bend Pilates Tower Core Workout

 

Painfree sexual intercourse during Menopause: Helpful tips by a Pelvic Floor PT

Physical therapists have helped women in menopause return to painfree, satisfying sexual intercourse. These women could experience pain with intercourse, even after rehydrating their vaginal tissues under the guidance of their GYN, due to pelvic floor muscle tension.   The pelvic floor is a group of muscles located at the bottom of the pelvis  surrounding the vaginal canal.  Intercourse requires that the muscles be flexible to be able to receive the penis and strong enough to contract to provide more intense orgasms.    All healthy muscles have a normal length during rest.  Unhealthy muscles have knots/fascial restrictions so they are stuck in tight position during rest.  So with a tight pelvic floor, the penis cannot enter and women can experience pain.

How to gain a healthy pelvic floor?  Treatment by a physical therapist trained in pelvic floor dysfunctions is optimum as we provide you with tailored manual expertise and guidance to heal.  Here are some helpful tips:

1)      STRETCH HIP/GLUTEAL MUSCLES Stretch the large muscles of your hip, and buttock region as they can actively refer pain into the pelvis and cause the pelvic floor muscles to overwork or be strained.  By actively stretching the hip flexors, hip external rotators, inner thigh (adductors), groin and hamstrings,  the pelvic floor is released and can function optimally.  Hold each static stretch for 30 seconds, done twice,  2x’s times a day.

2)      VISUALIZE A RELAXED PELVIC FLOOR   Chronically tight pelvic floor muscles need many reminders to relax throughout the day.   Every time you look at the watch or your mobile phone, ask yourself, “Where is my pelvic floor?”   Think about the area softening, melting, widening. Use any visualization that is calming to you, send a healing color to your pelvis to bring awareness and “let go”.

3)      BREATHE  Diaphagramatic breathing helps to relax the abdominal and pelvic regions.   Lie on your back, pillow under your knees. Place your hands on your stomach, bent elbows resting by your sides.  Inhale slowly through your nose for a count of 5 seconds.  During your inhalation, allow your stomach expand into your hands. Visualize your pelvic floor muscles widening as well.   With each inhalation,  imagine or visualize the pelvic floor muscles expanding in all directions, front, back , left , right.  Slowly exhale for 5 seconds. Repeat 5 times. Do once in morning and at night.

4)      NEUTRAL PELVIS Set up your computer/reading/art work space to fit your body versus your body having to adjust to the environment.  The chair should be at a comfortable height so your feet are supported either on the floor or a raised footrest.  “Good posture” is when a neutral spine in maintained.  When sitting, your weight should be on center of your pelvic bowl, your lower back resting against a lumbar cushion. The lumbar cushion gently pushes your lower back forward to maintain it’s natural curve.  You should not slump back to sit on your coccyx bone, nor too far forward on your pubic bone and no sitting on one side/hip for hours at a time.      Here is where a PT can really help you gain knowledge and best position of your body.

5)      SELF STRETCHING INTRAVAGINALLY  This is a technique where you can stretch the intravaginal tissues by inserting a clean left thumb intravaginally up to the level of the first thumb joint. Gently press or sweep your thumb along the right vaginal walls providing a deep stretch.  Do a few sweeps from the midline towards bottom of the right vaginal wall.  You can hold a few areas that feel tight or uncomfortable.   Then insert the right thumb intravaginally and sweep or apply pressure points along the left side of the vaginal wall.  Repeat a few times each side. Do once a day.

6)      DILATORS Dilators are also used to help women prepare for intercourse and to apply pressure to tight spots within the vaginal walls to stretch. Your PT can guide you on how to use them.

7)      PELVIC FLOOR STRENGTH   Once your pelvic floor muscles are lengthened, a basic pelvic floor strengthening program can begin. Your physical therapist can teach you how to best recruit these muscles without co contraction of the hip adductors, hip extensors, and breath holding.  A basic pelvic floor strength exercise can be done by holding a contraction for 10 full seconds, resting/relaxing for 20 seconds. Repeat this 10x’s.   Then do 10 quick contractions and quick relaxations, repeated 10x’s to stimulate the fast twitch fibers of the pelvic floor which are innervated during orgasm

8)      SQUAT Squatting exercise helps to lengthen the pelvic floor and increases the strength of your hip and buttocks muscles.  When performing either a quarter, half or full squat in good alignment, this provides great balance of the pelvis and pelvic floor muscle function.

9)      AN ORGASM A DAY… Yes, an orgasm a day keeps all the pelvic muscles happy and healthy