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Strong Abs during Pregnancy and for New Mom’s

The staff Doctors of Physical Therapy at EMH specialize in pre and postpartum physical therapy for a healthy pregnancy and a fast recovery after delivery. Preventing Diastasis Recti is one aspect of our expertise.
Please forward to all your pregnant/new mom friends and family!

Diastasis Recti Abdominis (DRA) can occur in up to 66% of pregnant women due to hormones that allow ligaments and joints to relax, the increasing baby size in utero, improper weight lifting (ie heavy food bags, other children, furniture etc), a history of prior C-section or abdominal surgery and repetitive poor mechanics during daily activities and lack of regular exercise.

Men can also develop DRA due to faulty weight lifting mechanics, obesity and chronic medical conditions that result in frequent coughing such as bronchitis.

What is a DRA?

DRA is defined as the separation and thinning of the rectus abdominus muscles (see diagram in green) and stretching of the linea alba (see diagram in blue). The linea alba runs from the xiphoid process (base of sternum) to the symphysis pubis (center of pelvic bone). Both the rectus abdominus muscle and linea alba are the main support for the front of the abdomen, keeping the visceral organs in place and functioning well. They also maintain pelvis stability during walking, lifting, bending and squatting.

What are the symptoms of DRA?

Symptoms may include:

  • Noticeable small or large bulge in the center abdomen
  • Sharp or burning abdominal pain during bending, lifting, standing and walking
  • Lower back pain
  • Feeling like the intestines or stomach may fall out
  • Poor posture
  • Longer term problems of prolonged DRA may include Stress Urinary Incontinence, Fecal Incontinence and Pelvic Organ Prolapse.

How To Measure for a DRA?

The best way to measure is a finger width measurement. Lie on your back, knees bent, head resting on floor/pillow. Place tips of 4 fingers across the body at naval or just above/below the naval per your comfort. Now raise your head and shoulders slightly upward. If your fingers descend inbetween the parallel rectus abdominus muscles on either side of your naval, measure how many fingers move downward. If there is a true split of the linea alba, your finger will fall into a space that feels squishy (your intestines live here!). A positive DRA is one where there more than 2 fingertips (1 inch or 2.5cm width) that lower. We have measured women with 3 to 4 inches ( 8cm) wide and have helped them narrow back to 1 inch (2.5cm) wide.

 

What to Do if you have a DRA?

Best to first consult a pelvic physical therapist for a tailored postural, stabilization and home exercise program targeting the Tranversus Abdominus (deepest and lowest muscle of our abdomen), the pelvic floor muscles and the multifidi muscles (lower back stabilizers). Here are some tips to help you immediately:

  • Avoid positions that may further separate the recti muscles, like doing sit ups, crunches, strong stretches of the abdomen, quick trunk rotation movements
  • Stand and sit symmetrically (not to weight bear more on one side vs the other)
  • During standing, gently unlock your knees and gently pull your stomach inward while breathing normally
  • Self bracing of your stomach with your hands pushing the rectus together when sneezing, coughing or laughing
  • Wear a pelvic and abdominal support product to help maintain erect trunk posture and decrease pain until your muscles are aligned and strong

 

 

Sitting is Detrimental To Your Health

“In the interest of keeping our  current and prior patients healthy (and happy) I am pleased to introduce “EMH Physical Therapy Better Health & Movement Blog”

Today ‘s article is about posture. The key to a healthy spine, pain free neck and lower back is to maintain a neutral spine throughout the day, work or play.

EMH Physical Therapy offers manual therapy to release restrictions,  low level laser therapy to stimulate healing and tailored exercise programs. Yes, we still offer individual 45 minute treatment sessions by one licensed Doctor of Physical Therapist.

The-health-hazards-of-sittingWritten By: Lauren Calado, DPT, PT 

Our bodies have 650 muscles and their function is to contract, stretch, fire up… MOVE.

Did you know that more than 80% of us sit for over 10 hours a day? As technology in the work-place and at home increases, physical activity is rapidly declining.

A New York Times article reported, “Jobs requiring moderate physical activity, which accounted for 50 percent of the labor market in 1960, have plummeted to just 20 percent” (2011). Add on more time dining, watching television and more than 75% of your day could be spent sitting. This is a functional contradiction to human anatomy and physiology and has a negative impact on your health.

The health risks of prolonged sitting include low back pain, muscle weakness, impaired posture, neck/shoulder pain, nerve impingements, decreased flexibility and pelvic floor dysfunction. Other disorders that may develop as a result of long periods of sitting are decreased cardiovascular endurance, obesity, poor circulation and decreased life span. Yikes!

Tips to decrease the health risks of sitting:

• Take one flight of stairs up/down instead of taking an elevator to your floor destination
• Walk to a co-worker to talk instead of calling/texting/emailing
• Stand up during TV commercials
• Perform a few different core/strength exercises such as standing squat, push up, or an abdominal exercise 10 reps twice a day.
• Wear one of the new fit bracelets to track your walking or cardio results
• Park your car further away from the office or your house
• Enter/Leave the subway station that is one stop away versus the closest station to home/work

Research shows that your brain needs a movement break after 50 minutes of working, thinking, sitting. Get up for the last 10 minutes of each hour to take a walk, pet the dog, do a quick errand. Your brain will be refreshed and creative thinking will be enhanced.

If you are experiencing sitting related problems, consult a physical therapist. Physical therapists have 7 years of education in advanced anatomy and physiology, movement science and interventional healing therapies. The Direct Access law allows you to consult a PT first, so you don’t have to see a doctor, get a prescription and be referred to physical therapy. We can help you heal from sitting related dysfunction.

 

Diastasis Recti Abdominis (DRA) or “Split Seams” can be treated by Pelvic Physical Therapy

Diastasis Recti Abdominis (DRA) can occur in up to 66% of pregnant women due to hormones that allow ligaments and joints to relax, the increasing baby size in utero, improper weight lifting (ie heavy food bags, other children, furniture etc), a history of prior C-section or  abdominal surgery and repetitive poor mechanics during daily activities and lack of regular exercise.

Men can also develop DRA due to faulty weight lifting mechanics, obesity and chronic medical conditions that result in frequent coughing such as bronchitis.

What is a DRA?

DRA is defined as the separation and thinning of the rectus abdominus muscles (see diagram in green) and stretching of the linea alba (see diagram in blue).  The linea alba runs from the xiphoid process (base of sternum)  to the symphysis pubis (center of pelvic bone).  Both the rectus abdominus muscle and linea alba are the main support for the front of the abdomen, keeping the visceral organs in place and functioning well.  They are also maintain pelvis stability during walking, lifting, bending and squatting.

What are the symptoms of DRA?

Symptoms may include:

Noticeable small or large bulge in the center abdomen

Sharp or burning abdominal pain during bending, lifting, standing and walking

Lower back pain

Feeling like the intestines or stomach may fall out

Poor posture

Longer term problems of prolonged DRA may include Stress Urinary Incontinence, Fecal Incontinence and Pelvic Organ Prolapse.

 

How To Measure for a DRA?

The best way to measure is a finger width measurement.  Lie on your back, knees bent,head resting on floor/pillow. Place tips of 4 fingers across the body at naval or just above/below the naval per your comfort.  Now raise your head and shoulders slightly upward. If your fingers descend inbetween the  parallel rectus abdominus muscles on either side of your naval, measure how many fingers move downward.  If there is a true split of the linea alba, your finger will fall into a space that feels squishy (your intestines live here!).  A positive DRA is one where there more than 2 fingertips (1 inch or 2.5cm width)  that lower.  We have measured women with 3 to 4 inches ( 8cm) wide and have helped them narrow back to 2.5cm width

 

What to Do if you have a DRA?

Best to first consult a pelvic physical therapist for a tailored postural, stabilization and home exercise program targeting the Tranversus Abdominus (deepest and lowest muscle of our abdomen), the pelvic floor muscles and the multifidi muscles (lower back stabilizers).

Here are some tips that you can do immediately:

Avoid positions that may further separate the recti muscles, like doing sit ups, crunches and quick trunk rotation movements.  Avoid being on “all fours”  or on hands and knees for too long during exercise classes.  Assuming the yoga, “cow position” where your belly drops down as your head and hips arch upwards,  puts too much pressure on the already stretched linea alba.  Plus, the yoga position of  “Up dog” and extensive backward bends are not recommended.

Stand and sit symmetrically in good posture  (don’t stand on one leg or sit with crossed legs leaning on one hip for too long)

When you are standing, gently unlock your knees and pull  your stomach inward while breathing normally to give abdominal  support and prevent “hanging out” on your ligaments

When you sneeze, cough or laugh you you can self bracing of your stomach with your hands pushing each side of the rectus abdominal muscles towards the midline, or hold a pillow against your stomach for bracing

Wear a pelvic and/or  abdominal support product to help support the growing baby in uteruo , maintain erect trunk posture and decrease pain until your muscles are stronger by doing core exercises.

By keeping your core toned during pregnancy and taking the steps to prevent further widening of your recti muscles, you can prevent extensive DRA.

 

 

Evelyn Hecht PT receives award for 20 years as member of HSS Rehab Network

Evelyn-Hecht individual-HSS-Annual-Meeting

Evelyn Hecht, PT receives an award from Hospital for Special Surgery on February 25, 2014.

Her company, EMH Physical Therapy was recognized for 20 years of excellence as a Charter Member of the HSS Rehabilitation Network