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A Pregnant Physical Therapist’s Top Tips for Your Healthy Pregnancy

Navigating the pregnancy literature on proper posture, exercise and sleeping alignment can be overwhelming and the guidelines presented are often not a “one size fits all”. Afterall, everyone’s pregnancy is unique. Below you will find some quick and easy tips that I utilized and found helpful throughout my pregnancy that kept me fit, aligned and pain free throughout my work day as a physical therapist at EMH.

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EMH Physical Therapy Goes To Chicago for The International Pelvic Pain Society (IPPS) Conference on Chronic Pelvic Pain

                                     

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screen-shot-2016-10-07-at-11-40-39-amAt EMH Physical Therapy, we support an interdisciplinary approach to treating our patients. We are in constant communication with primary care physicians, urologists, psychologists, gynecologists and other healthcare providers to make sure all our patients have a strong team working for them

A team based approach to medical care has been shown to prevent medical errors (1), improve patient-centered outcomes and chronic disease management (2-4). 

This week the EMH team are packing our bags and headed to Chicago to attend the International Pain Societys annual fall meeting on chronic pelvic pain where well hear practitioners of various disciplines discuss advances and techniques in treating pelvic pain. Some topics were excited about exploring include the mind-body” connection, psychosocial aspects of pelvic pain, cancer and pelvic pain, cystitis, hormone treatments, vulvodynia and more. 

The International Pelvic Pain Society (IPPS) was established in 1996 with the goals of educating health professionals on how to diagnose and manage chronic pelvic pain and to bring hope to men and women who suffer from this pain by raising public awareness (5). 

Their website, pelvicpain.org, contains articles which can help to educate patients on a wide variety of conditions and find healthcare providersWe are excited to share the information we learn at IPPS conference with all of you when we return to New York City next week! Stay tuned.

P.S. Well be active on Instagram, @emhpysicaltherapy, and Twitter, @EMHPH, while were away, so keep up with us there!

Resources:

1. IOM (Institute of Medicine) To err is human. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1999.

2. Bodenheimer T, Wagner EH, Grumbach K. Improving primary care for patients with chronic illness: The chronic care model, part 2. Journal of the American Medical Association.2002;288(15):19091914.

3. Ponte P, Conlin G, Conway J, et al. Making patient-centered care come alive: Achieving full integration of the patients perspective. Journal of Nursing Administration. 2003;33(2):8290.

4. Wagner EH, Austin BT, Davis C, Hindmarsh M, Schaefer J, Bonomi A. Improving chronic illness care: Translating evidence into action. Health Affairs. 2001;20(6):6478.

5. International Pelvic Pain Society. Pelvicpain.org

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PelviCorFit™ by EMH Physical Therapy Grand Opening

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Have you been working out for years, but neglecting a crucial muscle group??

At EMH Physical Therapy we recently launched our brand new PelviCoreFit™ program designed to whip your pelvic floor muscles into shape. Proper firing of pelvic floor muscles is not only essential for pelvic health but is also a key factor in overall core strength and fitness.

Visualize this:

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The pelvic floor muscles form a sling that transmit forces from the ground up and from your head down. If pelvic floor muscles are weak and unaccustomed to firing during exercise, you could be promoting a faulty movement pattern in the chain. Neglecting the Pelvic floor muscles can potentially lead to more serious conditions such as chronic hip, back or pelvic pain, urinary or fecal incontinence, GI and bowel disorders, and erectile or sexual dysfunction. At EMH Physical Therapy we will help you identify and strengthen the pelvic muscles during your general workouts to help prevent future dysfunction!

Additionally, did you know that the pelvic floor muscles play a fundamental role in breathing through connections to the diaphragm?  Think about doing cardio, executing a heavy lift, or performing a Vinyasa flow with a sub optimal breathing pattern. Strengthening the pelvic floor muscles can improve breathing which will help to optimize your workout efficiency.

Come try out our discounted  PelviCoreFit™ program, learn about proper activation of the pelvic floor muscles and bring your workouts to the next level!

We offer 2 options:

“PelviCorFit™ #1” – One fifty minute session with a DPT + Fitness Guru that includes 15 minute pelvic floor/core education followed by a 30 minute PelviCorFit™ workout, then Q&A. Regular price is $200. New Client price is $50

“PelviCorFit™ Pack” – Three (3) fifty minute sessions with your DPT + Fitness Guru. The first session is similar to the description above. The 2 follow up sessions include 45 minute PelviCorFit™ workouts plus instruction on how to implement pelvic floor awareness into your fitness program. Regular price is $500 for 3 sessions. New Client price is $130

To register call 212-288-2242

or

email info@emhphysicaltherapy.com

For more information click here

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Leaking is More Common Than You Think

Hmmm…. How to put this delicatelyWoman jogging on a track

Do you often find yourself leaking urine while exercising?  Squat… leak a little, overhead press… leak a little more, jump… forget about it, pants are soaked!

If this describes YOU, know that you are not alone. You likely fall into the 25% of women between the ages of 18-44, or the 44% of seniors, or the 33% of female athletes who experience varying levels of incontinence. These astounding statistics represent only those who have come forward to report symptoms. If you are skeptical, just take a look at YouTube (search “girl peeing while lifting weights”). You will find solidarity; everything from women admitting to leaking during exercise, to videos of complete loss of bladder control while executing a heavy lift. Today, there are even T-shirts glorifying urinary leakage during workouts in order to empower women and banish feelings of shame.

It is wonderful that women are finally coming forward to bring this previously taboo topic out into the open.  Just last week, Kate Winslet explained that she no longer jumps on trampolines for this very reason.  Leaking when exercising, sneezing, or coughing is so normal that Winslet’s admission was received with more “it’s nice to know she’s normal” reactions than surprised ones.  Yet, shockingly, statistics show that women will wait, on average, 6.5 years before reporting incontinence, because as normal is it may be, women rarely speak of it, even to their medical providers.  It’s no wonder urinary (and fecal) leakage has generated a $28 Billion dollar industry in the US alone.

If you are leaking while exercising, it is likely that your pelvic floor muscles are just not firing properly in order to withstand the load. We call this Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) which describes urinary leakage that occurs particularly with physical activity or exertion. While this issue is extremely common, it is not something you want to leave untreated. Whether you are losing a few drops or outright “peeing your pants”, help is out there, in some cases, right around the corner.

First you must understand that the pelvic floor muscles are just that: muscles. Therefore, you can strengthen them like any other muscle. We spend hours in the gym attempting to perfect every muscle in the body, but somehow forget the pelvic floor, a keystone to our overall health and fitness.

The tricky part is that you can’t easily see these muscles. As a matter of fact, you may not even be able to feel them. That is where Pelvic floor rehabilitation comes to the rescue. At EMH, we teach you how to identify, isolate and strengthen the pelvic floor muscles to restore normal function. We then help you integrate pelvic floor techniques back into your exercise routine so that you can squat, overhead press, and jump “leak free”.

So at your next holiday party, just think to yourself — 1 in 4 of the women in this room are currently peeing in their pants. Luckily, you don’t have to be one of them.

Pelvic PT highly rated in new IC Guidelines

The American Urological Association (AUA) released a new update to their 2011 Guideline on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome (IC/BPS). The original guidelines included research studies up through 2009. This new revision includes research studies through 2013. Read the amended guidelines here!

“Although the science relevant to IC/BPS is continually improving and evolving, it is still a challenging and complicated condition to diagnose and treat,” said Philip Hanno, MD, who chaired the multi-disciplinary Panel that developed and updated the Guideline. “…this Guideline is fully aligned to the latest science and provides physicians with a relevant blueprint to treating patients.”

Developed as a treatment guide and planning tool, the 2011 guidelines introduced a six step treatment plan. Newly diagnosed patients generally begin with strategies outlined in Step One and then, if those strategies do not bring symptom relief, are advised to try Step Two treatments and so forth. The treatments are classified within the steps based upon their risk of adverse events and/or if the treatment is reversible. Surgery, for example, would never be used as a first line intervention because it is irreversible and could cause very serious complications. Rather, surgery is listed as a Step Six treatment and would only be considered after the patient has tried and failed the therapies listed in Step One Through Step Five.

Two Key Changes

Comprehensive Physical Therapy Encouraged

In Step Two, Pelvic Physical Therapy was suggested for patients who present with pelvic floor tenderness with the highest review possible, Grade A. It states:

Appropriate manual physical therapy techniques (e.g., maneuvers that resolve pelvic, abdominal and/or hip muscular trigger points, lengthen muscle contractures, and release painful scars and other connective tissue restrictions), if appropriately-trained clinicians are available, should be offered to patients who present with pelvic floor tenderness. Pelvic floor strengthening exercises (e.g., Kegel exercises) should be avoided. Standard (Evidence Strength Grade A).

Botox Therapy Rating Improved!

Botox A was reclassified from Step Five to Step Four. New research emerged which showed that using BotoxA at a lower dosage, (from 200u to 100u) substantially reduced the risk of a troublesome complication, the need for self-catheterization. If a Botox treatment silences the nerves which control urination, a patient may be forced to self- catheterize until the effect wears off, often for months. One criteria for the use of Botox is the ability of a patient to self-catheterize if necessary. If a patient is unable to do so, this therapy is not recommended. The guidelines state:

Intradetrusor botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) may be administered if other treatments have not provided adequate symptom control and quality of life or if the clinician and patient agree that symptoms require this approach. Patients must be willing to accept the possibility that post-treatment intermittent self- catheterization may be necessary. Option (Evidence Strength- C)

Learn more about IC Treatments, including all treatment options in the AUA Guidelines here!

Pelvic Pain App developed by Evelyn Hecht, PT

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“She inspires us to not accept the status quo, to strive for wonderful things and not just acceptable things. There’s a lot of good nuggets of wisdom and interesting ways of looking at the profession. Some Apps are fun but the best are more about life”-  Dr Joe Simon

 

I felt this quote was the best to describe my thoughts about this interview. Dr Evelyn Hecht has been treating patients with Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (PFD) longer than there has been a doctorate program at my alma mater. But innovation is not the key to riches. Evelyn saw a need in the marketplace and decided unlike many in our industry not to wait for someone else to do it .

Lately i have consulted with more and more physicians and surgeons on their legacy or exit strategy. Evelyn is no where near the end , matter of fact , she is on the cusp of a new road in healthcare. Apps are a highway of free traffic from possible clients from around the world. Evelyn has just made it easier for the vast population to accept her as the expert in the field.

Pelvic floor therapy is a growth factor for practices across the country. This new specialization is growing with a medical network from physicians, physios & psychologists.

INTRODUCING, PELVIC TRACK a new app to help PATIENTS and practitioners to work together. The challenges associated with communication with the therapist dealing with pelvic floor therapy. Again , it was not looking for a better mousetrap but to create one that doesn’t exist from the need of her patients and her therapists.

The motivation for our new grad and younger (not age but career wise)  listeners. Evelyn has made strides and conquered the niche market. Marketing pelvic floor therapy through facebook, through her blog and now through her App is something i would ask all my listeners to take a deeper look at.

I hope you find the takeaways that I did.

For more info or to read the article directly click  HERE

To purchase or for more info on Pelvic Track App click HERE

Pelvic physical therapy is an effective non invasive treatment for Pelvic Organ Prolapse vs “high risk” transvaginal mesh surgery

The FDA recently deemed use of transvaginal mesh surgery to be “high risk” to repair pelvic organ prolapse.  See news link below:

http://www.philly.com/philly/health/womenshealth/HealthDay687309_20140429_FDA_Moves_Female_Incontinence_Device_to__High_Risk__Status.html

Pelvic physical therapy is a more effective and non invasive option.

In a 2014 study of 800 women with pelvic floor dysfunction (which includes pelvic organ prolapse) by University of Missouri, researchers found that ” incontinence, constipation, and/or pain improve by 80% with pelvic physical therapy”. Research shows that pelvic physical therapy plus a prescribed home exercise program works better than just engaging in one option.

Pelvic physical therapy teaches patients with pelvic organ prolapse how to build up the “floor” or muscular base of the pelvis. The pelvic floor muscles provide the main support for all pelvic organs. Kegels alone are not the only treatment option. If there is tension in the pelvic floor muscles, they need to to be released via manual therapies or risk further dysfunction. Sitting posture and good voiding habits are addressed, exercises are prescribed and body awareness improved.

EMH Physical Therapy has been providing successful pelvic physical therapy for 18 years in NYC. We have helped thousands of women return to better function. Call us today to get your prescription for pelvic health.

Evelyn Hecht PT receives award for 20 years as member of HSS Rehab Network

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Evelyn Hecht, PT receives an award from Hospital for Special Surgery on February 25, 2014.

Her company, EMH Physical Therapy was recognized for 20 years of excellence as a Charter Member of the HSS Rehabilitation Network

Women’s Pelvic Health

Women's Pelvic Health

 

 

Check out this link ( link) to see Evelyn’s interview on physical therapy for women’s pelvic health in the Los Angeles Times. The app, Pelvic Track, is now available on the Apple store.

 

 

Tips for regaining firm abs and pelvic floor for all Moms

As a licensed physical therapist specializing in pelvic floor and core dysfunction, I treat women who experience pelvic pain, sexual pain, leaking, constipation, urinary urgency, have restricted C-section/episiotomy scars and  weak pelvic and core muscles, months or years after delivering their children (Vaginal or C-Section).

If all moms consulted a physical therapist soon after giving birth, this is what I would teach:

1)   To prevent leaking urine or feces, or future prolapses of the bladder or rectum, do pelvic floor strengthening exercises (if there is no pelvic pain). Many women do not know how to recruit these small muscles surrounding the vaginal and anal region.  Some either hold their breath, or tighten their inner thighs, gluteal and abdominal muscles when doing the pelvic floor muscle contraction.  A licensed PT can guide on how to recruit these muscles without substitution via our manual and biofeedback therapies.

Pelvic Floor Strength Exercise: Contract the pelvic floor muscles (squeeze the anal and vaginal regions) for up to 10 full seconds (one – one thousand, two -one-thousand, etc). Then, more importantly, relax,  completely let go of the contraction, softening for up to 20 seconds. If 10 second contraction and 20 second relaxation is too much, start with 5 seconds contraction and 10 second relaxation. Do this exercise 10 times, once in the morning and once at the end of the day. They can be performed in lying, sitting even standing (once you are good at the exercise).

2) To reduce pelvic pain, breathe and relax your pelvic floor muscles.  Slow deep breathing, produces a calming effect on your muscles, heart, and brain activity. It also gently massages the abdominal contents. If you have pelvic/lower back/hip/groin or abdominal pain, consult with your doctor first and then see a pelvic physical therapist for our targeted therapies and exercises to reduce pain and regain function.

Diaphragmatic Breath Exercise:  Inhale for 5 seconds, hold the inhale for 5 seconds, exhale for 5 seconds. Repeat 2 times, twice a day or as needed.  During your inhalation, allow your stomach to expand or balloon to allow the diaphragm to descend which  fills the lungs with oxygen. As the stomach expands, think letting the pelvic floor muscles widen, soften (no pushing outward!).  As you exhale, allow the stomach to contract and see if you can keep your pelvic floor muscles relaxed.

3) To reduce your belly post baby, reduce the DR or “diastasis rectus”, which is the separation of the two long rectus abdominal muscles as the baby grew in utero, you can wear a compression garment and strengthen your lower abdominal muscles.  The abdominal binders and/or compression shorts that support the pelvic floor can be worn daily during and after delivery to prevent further widening of the DR.

Core Exercise: Breathe in. Breathe out and think of zipping up a tight pair of jeans.  There should be no major movement of your spine, just the lower abdominal region moving “up and in” as it tightens. Hold this for 5 seconds. Breath in as you release.  Breathe out as you tighten and hold.  Repeat 10 times. Do this 5 times throughout the day.  A physical therapist can help with your DR by modifying the exercise. This can be done during pregnancy to minimize the DR and keep a strong core.

4) To prevent binding of fascia, abdominal restrictions and  pain, mobilize your C-section scar.

Scar Tissue Massage: Gently press your fingers against the scar and pull the scar in a upward direction and hold the end range for a minute. Then move downwards, to the R, and L sides, holding the end range of each direction for a minute, until you feel less burning, less tension. Eventually you can try to pick up the scar up in-between your thumb and fingers to lift the scar away from your body, affording more stretch.  For perineal scars, your physical therapist can perform manual therapies and guide you in self perineal stretches and use of a dilator to help increase the flexibility of the scar.

5) To return to pain free intercourse, if painful due to episiotomy scar, your physical therapist can perform intravaginal manual therapy, scar mobilization and teach you how to gradually and painlessly stretch your vaginal area with dilators.

Along with postural exercises, instruction on how to lift, carry and feed baby, your physical therapist can help you regain your body, prepare for another child and most importantly, prevent the pain and other issues that so many of our mothers took for granted as a “normal part of having babies”.