fbpx

Let’s talk about sex-things I learned at the ‘International Society for the Study of Women’s Sexual Health’ annual conference

At the recent ISSWSH www.isswsh.org conference in San Diego there was a lot of talk about sex. Psychologists, physical therapists, researchers, sexual medicine doctors and a spine surgeon presented on insights and medical advances to improve women’s sex drive (hypoarousal no more!); reducing pain during/following sex; balancing hormones (estrogen is good!); post menopause in the bedroom (women in their 60-70’s have sex!) transgender information (3% of highschool students in a major US city say they are transgender). Today’s blog is about the big insights in treating vaginal pain.

Many women still think that it’s normal to have vaginal pain during and following intercourse.  Some experience vaginal burning, itching, pain and feel raw in this area 24/7 and sex increases their pain.

Women may be embarrassed, think this experience is normal, some even feel guilty so they don’t tell their doctors. Unfortunately, many doctors do not ask 3 important questions:

  1. Do you feel pain during/after intercourse?
  2. Are you happy with your sex drive?
  3. Can you achieve orgasm and if yes, are you satisfied with the quality?

 

 

Women with persistent pain can get stuck in a cycle of pain. Vaginal pain causes tension of the pelvic floor/abdominal muscles which can lead to depression, anxiety and catastrophizing behavior. If not treated effectively, they can develop a hypersensitive central nervous system and overprotective brain which worsens pain.  To break this cycle, it’s crucial to find out what type of vaginal pain she has, as each requires a completely different medical approach.

 

The following is a general information guide – see your doctor to get your specific diagnosis!

 

After taking a good history and listening to your symptoms, your doctor that specializes in sexual medicine will do a physical exam, using a Q-tip to gently press against each point of the Vestibule (see image below)

The vestibule is divided like a clock, the top portion, 9 to 3 o’clock is considered the “anterior vestibule” and contains Skenes glands.  The lower 4 to 8 o’clock are considered the “posterior vestibule” contains Bartholin glands and reflect how tense or relaxed are the pelvic floor muscles. Redness of the vestibule is not always an easy way to determine pain because it’s naturally red due to lots of blood vessels.

Complete Vestibulodynia

The whole vestibule, anterior and posterior portions are super sensitive to the Q-tip touch.

This is due to a dominance of estrogen (the pill, acne medicine, facial hair medicine all contains estrogen). These women are not getting enough androgen and testosterone, male hormones that the vestibule needs to be balanced.  Treating this type of vaginal pain is challenging because the woman on the pill has to discontinue and find alternate birth control methods. Teenagers being treated for acne will have it return, so coming off estrogen is a challenge yet once done, this type of vaginal pain will completely heal.  The time it takes to heal – in 6 months she is 50% better and in a year, she is  100% better.  While waiting for the body to balance, doing some healthy mental and physical exercises from the relieve program (link) can also help.

Inflammatory Vestibulitis.

If a woman has a history of chronic infections or if she is one of the 3-4% of American woman who is allergic to propylene glycol which is found in all vaginal gels, yeast creams, steroid creams such as the over the counter Monistat.  Woman may have been incorrectly diagnosed with a yeast infection and given creams (that contains propylene glycol) which causes more sensation of rawness, burning and cutting. What’s happening is that the inflammatory cells, called Mast cells, actually signal nerve endings to grow into the vaginal tissue which makes women feel more pain.

How to treat? If women can be seen within 6 months of symptom onset, they’ll be started on Interferon, a medicine which stops the production of mast cells.

If the woman is seen after 6 months, then treatment is more challenging. Either they use of a capsaicin crème (hot pepper component which removes “Substance P” of the nerve ending or desensitizes the nerve). Treatment is for 12 weeks of use of nightly cream – doable, but painful. Other option is surgery (vestibulectomy) to remove the affected tissue.

Congenital Neuroproliferation.

There is an increased amount of nerve fibers in the vestibule since birth.  These women could never use a tampon. A quick test is to touch your inner belly button and gently press inward. If you feel increase pain/sensitivity in your vagina, then this may be the cause for your pain. How can this be? The umbilicus shares the same embryonic tissue as the vestibule – so they are connected and have the same increased nerve fiber growth.

Treatment is surgical removal of the vestibular tissue (which healthily heals without the extra dense nerve fibers) resulting in no pain.

Overactive Pelvic Floor

Women who experience vaginal pain and have pain with the Q-tip test at the 4-8o’clock region, the posterior vestibule, with no sensitivity in the anterior vestibule. These women have overly tense pelvic floor muscles and this is the most common cause for vaginal pain.  Women can also experience symptoms of urinary frequency, urgency, sensation of incomplete emptying, constipation, rectal fissures, hemorrhoids.

This condition can be effectively treated by pelvic physical therapy. Pelvic PT includes releasing tension in the muscles of the lower back, sacrum, inner thighs, pelvic floor, teaching breathing techniques to relax the pelvic floor muscle, biofeedback, use of dilators and bladder and bowel retraining exercises.

Biopsychosocial Approach for Chronic Pain

Over the last 10 years, we also are now understanding why people stay in chronic pain for months, years, even decades.  Once an injured or chronically inflamed tissue has healed, why is there pain?

 

The answer is that they have developed an overprotective brain and hypersensitive nervous system. Without being aware of their habits developed due to social norms, family history, past experiences with pain, some people learn to be in a pattern of pain. Once the tissue issue has been healed, yet there is still pain, pain is the brain’s way to protect your body.   Ongoing negative experiences like a fight with your partner, stress at work, abuse at home, loss of a pet, saying non-loving, fear-based statements to yourself all day, not having or doing something that gives you joy  (even for a few minutes) can make the brain feel you are always in danger and send pain to protect you.

 

The Doctors of Physical Therapy at EMH are well versed in helping women heal from chronic pain using the biopsychosocial approach as well as our pelvic floor physical therapy for vaginal tissue based pain.  Our e-Book, re.lieve Solutions for Chronic Pain can help you learn self-help techniques to lower chronic pain.  Here’s the link: http://emhphysicaltherapy.com/product/re-lieve-solutions/

 

In summary, women can have a healthy fulfilling sex life – to find a provider, go to isswsh.org.

 

Painful sex? Check out our helpful tips about what you can do to help!

If you’re having pain during sex, try the following tips:

You should have a consult with a pelvic floor physical therapist for training on positioning and how to use a set of vaginal dilators:

They are used to stretch the vaginal tissue, facilitate pelvic muscle relaxation and prepare for intercourse.

If you are able to have penetrative sex:

  • Practice breathing techniques or stretching prior to intercourse
  • You may want to begin with clitoral stimulation to increase natural lubrication and vaginal expansion prior to insertion
  • You can use the dilator with your partner if you feel comfortable as a way to transition from medical to sexual use of dilator. This practice can help prepare you for engaging in sexual intercourse and help you both come to understand the challenge of the healing process and develop skills for working together as a team
  • The transition from plastic dilators to a partner’s penis is often an exciting step for a couple. To make the transition, your partner has to learn a passive role, letting you control the insertion and then just resting inside the vagina for a while. In time you can expand this exercise to permit insertion by the male of his own penis, clitoral stimulation, some thrusting and experimentation with different positions.
  • Use plenty of lubricant and use one that is water soluble
  • Apply ice or frozen blue gel pack wrapped in one layer of a hand towel to relieve burning after intercourse. Frozen peas or corn in a small sealed plastic bag mold comfortably to vulvar anatomy.

Keep in mind that intercourse isn’t always 100% comfortable. Temporary tugs and pressures are often just part of getting started. If some minor discomfort exists, try moving ahead anyway – but if obvious pain persists, don’t ignore it, stop. If you encounter unexpected difficulty, you may want to practice with the dilators some more before attempting intercourse again. Continued dilator use may be necessary from time to time, to keep the vaginal area relaxed and comfortable.

Don’t miss your chance to listen to Evelyn Hecht, PT, ATC speak about modern pain science and how she’s been using it to help heal chronic pain

 

Follow this link to listen to Evelyn’s episode of the Healing Pain Podcast: listen to podcast here

Help, I’m having pain in my left ovary!

 

 

 

 

 

 

OBGYN’s hear this complaint frequently and of course, will examine your reproductive organs.  However, most one sided lower abdominal pain is not due to problems of the either ovary, but mainly due to  muscle tension that crosses the same region where the ovaries are located.

 

It could be a hip or back muscle.

This image shows your hip flexor, called the iliopsoas muscle.    The x’s show where trigger points of this muscle are typically located. The red dots show the areas where people complain of pain

 

 

 

This image shows a back muscle called the quadratus lumborum or QL for short.

 

 

 

Both of these muscles can refer pain into the lower abdomen as shown in the shaded red dotted areas. This can commonly be interpreted as ovarian pain.

How to self-treat:

Hip flexor stretch:

Begin in a half kneeling position with your front left knee bent at a 90 degree angle. Next, squeeze the glutes and tuck in your tailbone, while gently lunging forward to feel a stretch in your right hip flexor. Switch sides. Do 2x 30 second holds, twice a day.

Quadratus Lumborum stretch:

Straddle a chair. Side bend to the left side and imagine you are trying to lift your right ribcage up and drop your right hip downwards, to feels a stretch on right side of the body. Switch sides. Complete 2 x 30 second holds, twice a day.

If pain persists or gets worse, see a women’s health physical therapist.

Chronic Pain: New Science provides Solutions for Complete Recovery (Part 1)

Chronic pain is a worldwide epidemic, affecting 1.5 billion people1.   In the USA we spend over $635 BILLION dollars treating chronic pain, visiting multiple medical practitioners, getting  tests, injections, prescription medications, and surgeries2.     With all the amazing advances made in treating cancer, diabetes and heart conditions, the numbers of people suffering with chronic pain has not lowered; in fact it’s increasing.

The good news is that we have learned more about pain in the past 10 years than ever before. The fields of neuroscience, physical therapy, psychology and nutrition have unearthed a treasure trove of knowledge to help people truly heal from chronic pain. There are a number of non-invasive, low risk self-help treatments that people with chronic pain can do simultaneously while they receive treatments by their doctors, physical therapists and other health practitioners to achieve total chronic pain relief.

Chronic Pain Defined

Chronic pain is pain that lasts longer than the normal tissue healing time of 3-6 months. Note: this blog does not include the pain caused by active cancers nor end of life pain issues. So, by the end of 6 months all tissues (skin, muscles, fascia, tendons, ligaments, nerves and bones) should be completely healed barring no major complications such as infections, disease processes or re-injuries.

3 Phases of Healing

Below is what our body does after getting a physical injury:

Inflammatory phase 3-7 days from original injury: when you feel most pain or see redness and swelling. Swelling shows that your body is doing an excellent job of healing and prevents further injury to the area.

Repair (Proliferation) phase 2-6 weeks from original injury: depending on the tissue (skin heals faster than bone). New collagen is laid down, like weaving a basket or sewing up a hole in your socks. Collagen replaces the torn, strained, or fractured tissue.

Remodeling phase 3-6 months from original injury: this phase starts when production of new collagen stops. New collagen is usually stiff, inflexible and needs to be remodeled, lengthened, and strengthened to your pre injury state and function. This is best achieved by going to physical therapy and doing your exercises.

Acute Pain Process

If the normal healing timeline takes 6 months at most, why do so many people experience chronic pain for years, sometimes decades past the original injury? Before we can understand how pain becomes chronic, here’s how our nervous system and brain works when we are experiencing acute injury pain.

When we first sprain our ankle, specialized sensors in our skin called “nociceptors” are activated (see red “Nociceptive Information” ).  Nociceptors are not pain sensors- rather pressure sensors, chemical sensors and stretch sensors. In fact, we don’t have actual “pain sensors” in our bodies. Nociceptors sense that your ankle ligament is overstretched or your muscle fibers are torn and sends this information to the brain.

 

Brain is our Protector

Your brain’s main role is to protect your body, so when your brain receives the nociceptive signals about the overstretched/torn tissues, it also checks your surrounding environment and assesses the situation to decide how best to protect.

Let’s say you twisted your ankle in a pothole while crossing a busy NYC street. You need to run quickly or you may be hit by oncoming cars. The brain decides that you need to get to safety first so it allows you to run on your injured ankle WITHOUT PAIN by sending pain reducing chemicals to the area. Once you are safely on the sidewalk, the brain sends pain signals to your ankle so you immediately take your weight off your foot. Your brain has effectively protected you from harm both by decreasing and increasing pain. This whole process happens in milliseconds.

 Brain is the Boss of Pain

Our brains are capable of learning and creating new nerve pathways throughout our whole lifetime. This is called “neuroplasticity”3.  Areas of the brain that are used very frequently show high levels of activity (as seen in brain MRI scans) and may actually increase in size4.  Before iPhones and Google Maps, London cab drivers had to memorize the whole intricate street map of the city before they could get their licenses. Studies show that they actually have enlarged areas in the brain associated with memory. The brain changes based on how we use it.

The brain is the center where the actual sensation of physical pain originates from and gets relief. People who experience chronic pain have a brain and nervous system that has learned to be in a heightened state, always on guard awaiting the next danger signal. What leads to this “faulty wiring” of our brain and nervous system?  Some factors include:

  1. Childhood and early social experiences – did you suffer loss/lack of love or did you feel safe and supported? These experiences affect how we respond to both physical and emotional pain.
  2. Daily thoughts and self-talk – are they positive or tend to be negative/fear based?
  3. Current social interactions – are they mostly supportive, like seeing a good friend, petting your cat or stressful, like fighting with your spouse/children?
  4. Your Expectations- are you afraid of bending forward because years ago a doctor said it could flare up your back pain? 5,6

Nutrition, exercise, restful sleep plays just an important role in total healing which we will discuss in the next few blogs. While we can’t change what happened to us in the past, the good news is that our brains can relearn healthy patterns to lower/stop chronic pain.

While receiving medical care from your doctor, you can simultaneously  retrain your brain to learn healthy processes, decrease fear based movement patterns, use mindfulness to stop negative catastrophizing thoughts, breathing techniques to lower fear/anxiety and much more.

At EMH Physical Therapy, we offer a chronic pain recovery program, called re·lieve, which educates patients in the new science of pain and teaches them a scientifically proven self-help program along with providing any needed manual and movement therapies.

Stay tuned for Part 2 of  “Solutions for Complete Recovery of Chronic Pain”.

References

1.Committee on Advancing Pain Research, Care, and Education. Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research. Washington, D.C.: Institute of Medicine of the National Academies; 2011.

2.Darrell J. Gaskin, Patrick Richard. The economic costs of pain in the United StatesThe Journal of Pain 2012;13(8):715

3.Draganski B, May A. Training-induced structural changes in the adult human brain. Behav Brain Res 2008;192:137-42

4.Johansson BB. Brain plasticity in health and disease. Keio J Med 2004;53:231-46.

5.Seifert F, Maihofner C. Functional and structural imaging of pain-induced neuroplasticity. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol 2011; 24: 515-523

6.Sandkühler J. Learning and memory in pain pathways. Pain 2000; 88: 113-118

7.Jensen M. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine in people without low back pain. New Eng J Med. 1994;331: 69-73.

8.Katharina A. Schwarz, Roland Pfister, Christian Büchel. Rethinking Explicit Expectations: Connecting Placebos, Social Cognition, and Contextual Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 2016

 

 

 

POOPING 101 – Part 1

What is one thing we all have in common? What brings us all together? We all poop!  How much do you know about your bowel movements? What does it mean when your stool is a different color, shape, texture? What leads to constipation or diarrhea? How can we have a healthy bowel movement and how often should we have a bowel movement?

 

I am writing this blog in two parts to help you have a better understanding of the mysterious #2, because pooping is an integral part of our daily life and can tell us a lot about our health.

DIGESTION

Lets start from the beginning, how food travels from entry to exit:

1. ORAL CAVITY & ESOPHAGUS Digestion begins in the mouth, as saliva helps break down starches. The esophagus is the portal to which the contents travel to our stomach. No digestion occurs here, but “heart burn” can occur when there is backflow from the stomach up into the esophagus through the cardiac orifice seen above.

2. STOMACH Now that the food has made it to the stomach, acids break down proteins. Food spends approximately 2-4 hours here before traveling to the small intestine through the pyloric sphincter

3. SMALL INTESTINE  In the small intestine, over the course of 4-6 hours, our body continues to break down starches and proteins and tackle a new molecular compound called carbohydrates. Juices secreted from the pancreas and liver help break down starches, fats and proteins.

4. LARGE INTESTINE What’s next? You guessed it, the large intestine, which absorbs 1000- 1500 mL per day, leaving 100-150 mL along as hardened feces to the rectum. Digestive contents spend the longest time here, approximately 24-72 hours. It travels through the ileocecal valve up the right side of the abdomen through the ascending colon, across the transverse colon and down the left side into the descending colon.

5. RECTUM Using strong peristaltic waves, our bodies push stool into the rectum. That’s when we have our first urge to defecate. We have stretch receptors which tell our bodies to relax an involuntary muscle called the internal anal sphincter while we close our external anal sphincter (EAS) to keep feces from coming out until we are ready.When we sit on the toilet, our EAS relaxes along with our puborectalis muscle. This relaxation combined with a gentle increase in intra-abdominal pressure pushes fecal matter out. Placing our knees higher than our hips, via a squatty potty or stool, helps relax the puborectalis muscle even more, allowing from easier elimination as shown below. The external anal sphincter (EAS) changes its tone based on what it senses. If it senses liquid, such as diarrhea, the EAS increases its tone. If it senses, gas, it allows that to be selectively released. If it senses solid stool, our body can override our urge to defecate until we are at a toilet, so we can hold it in when necessary.

When we sit on the toilet, our EAS relaxes along with our puborectalis muscle which surrounds the rectum tightly at rest creating the “anorectal angle”. When the puborectalis relaxes it allows the rectum to have easier passage. This combined with a gentle increase in intra-abdominal pressure pushes fecal matter out. Placing our knees higher than our hips, via a squatty potty or stool, helps relax the puborectalis muscle even more, allowing  easier elimination.

GOOD DEFECATION TECHNIQUE

A healthy bowel movement (BM) should not involve straining or pushing. The action of defecation is a part of the parasympathetic nervous system, which helps the body soften and relax. The first step to a good BM is making sure you are in a comfortable, safe place. Have you ever noticed it’s easier “to go” at home versus in an unfamiliar place?

If we lose our ability to properly relax with a bowel movement we may start to strain with defecation, which over time is injurious to our body.

Here are some quick, easy tips for a healthy BM.

  • Sit with your knees above your hips, feet resting on  a child’s step stool or “Squatty Potty”
  • Place both hands on your abdomen, or, if you have jaw tension, support your head in your hands
  • Draw up or contract your pelvic floor muscles as though you are trying to hold back gas
  • Relax your pelvic floor muscles as though you are trying to release gas
  • Note how the stomach muscles relax and bulge forward
  • Relax the pelvic floor muscles and think of widening the rectal opening
  • Imagining your body is a tube of toothpaste, pushing from the top down, brace and breathe out
  • You can use certain sounds such as “grrr” and “shhh” to help gently increase intra-abdominal pressure to pass stool

If you feel like you are unable to perform an easy BM even with taking fiber, drinking water, or are spending too much time in the bathroom, straining often, or experience frequent constipation and bloating, consult a pelvic floor physical therapist.  We’ll assess if restricted pelvic floor, abdominal muscles are hindering your function. We perform gentle manual therapies to restricted muscles/fascia of both internal and external pelvic areas, visceral mobilization  to help the organs move optimally and “do their thing”,  use biofeedback to retrain the pelvic floor muscles so they don’t contract when they are supposed to relax, teach breathing techniques and other home exercises.

Stay Tuned for “Pooping 101 – Part 2”!

 

 

 

Hey Women! Let’s learn about your lady parts!

With women’s rights being a hot button issue recently, it got me thinking: how many women really know and explore the parts that make them a woman? (Disclaimer: I’m not forgetting those in the LGBQT community who have different anatomy and identify as a woman. You do you, girl!)

So ladies…What’s down there? Grab a mirror and play along.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Externally you will see three openings:

  1. The urethral opening which is closest to the front of your body (where we eliminate pee)
  2. The vaginal opening in the middle (where intercourse occurs and also the birth canal)
  3. The rectal opening below (where we eliminate poop)

The urethral and vaginal openings are housed in the first skin layer,        called labia majora (with pubic hair) and just underneath, the labia minora (hairless layer) that protect these openings.

Also protected by the labia just above the urethral opening is a small sensitive, nerve filled structure with two hidden “legs”  that surrounds either side of the vaginal opening called the Clitoris. The head of the clitoris is very sensitive and serves in sexual function for arousal when stimulated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The clitoris is considered the most erogenous zone on the female body.  Stimulation of the more than 8,000 nerve endings here can lead to the rhythmic, quick flick pelvic floor contractions that we interpret as pleasurable. Yes, I’m talking about orgasm!

Now that you are acquainted with the anatomy use a mirror to check your own lady parts. Then do some of the following movements:

  1. Try a Kegel: contract pelvic floor like you are stopping the flow of urine or don’t want to pass gas. You’ll  lifting of the pelvic area upwards
  2. Try a reverse kegel: bear down like trying to pass a bowel movement. You should see the pelvic area gently bulge outward
  3. Cough or laugh. You should observe an initial lifting up/in of the pelvic floor, with a quick relax back to normal position

 

Let’s take a look at the Pelvic Floor muscles.

In this image, the external skin is removed and you are now looking at the underlying muscles. These muscles are important stabilizers of the pelvis and serve many functions: bowel and bladder control, core stabilizers, involved with sexual function and support of bladder and other visceral organs.

You can check your pelvic muscles by inserting one clean finger into the vaginal opening to the level between 1st and 2nd knuckle. Assess your strength by squeezing the inserted finger (doing a kegel) by contracting your pelvic floor muscles.  You should feel a ring of tension around your finger and feel a gentle pull upwards toward your head.

Assess for tension in the muscles by stretching directly to the right, left, down and diagonally up/right, diagonally up/left, down/right, down/left. No need for direct upward pressure as this is where your urethra is located.  A healthy pelvic floor should feel no pain, only pressure or stretch.

I hope this helped you to feel more comfortable and aware of your female anatomy. In a study published in the International Journal of Sexual Health, scientists found that women who had a positive view of their genitals were more comfortable in their skin, more apt to orgasm, and more likely to experiment in bed. So go ahead and get to know your lady parts.

Remember:

A healthy female pelvic floor has

  • no pelvic pain or pain/tingling/feeling of pressure in the sexual organs,
  • painless intercourse and insertion of tampons,
  • the ability to stay relaxed and soft, not to be chronically tense, which leads to pelvic/back/hip pain,
  • ease of voiding (of pee and poop) with no issues of frequency, bladder pain, nor straining during every BM due to constipation
  • no leaking when lifting weights, laughing , sprinting for a bu

If you experience any symptoms, consult an experienced pelvic floor physical therapist for evaluation and guidance.

Multi-Disciplinary Approach is best for relieving Chronic Pelvic Pain

Evelyn and her DPT staff traveled to Chicago for the International Pelvic Pain Society conference to learn about the evolving sciences and evidence based treatment for pelvic pain.

Pelvic pain is typically located in the lower part of your abdomen & pelvis and can stem from the reproductive, urinary or musculoskeletal systems. The cause of pelvic pain can be complicated, involving interactions between gastro-intestinal, genito-urinary, musculoskeletal, nervous, endocrine systems and can include socio-cultural factors.

So it’s important to have a medical team working with you. Your team can include a urologist, pelvic physical therapist, gynecologist, gastroenterologist, psychologist, radiologist acupuncturist and sex therapist.

In our experience we find that patients just need 2-3 team members such as a medical doctor well versed in pelvic pain to guide on medications and general health, an experienced pelvic physical therapist who provides education, manual and movement therapy, and a talk therapist to address underlying emotional traumas. 

UPOINT  helps MD’s find best treatments for Male pelvic pain

Most men with symptoms of chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS), such as penile pain or discomfort, urinary urgency/frequency, inability to sit, testicular pain and/or ED, have been given a diagnosis of “Non Bacterial Prostatitis” and prescribed antibiotics. I often hear from my patients that the medicine didn’t help, as their prostate gland was not infected, which is what antibiotics target. Many men were not getting pain/symptom relief from antibiotics and doctors needed a better system to determine the cause of CPPS.  UPOINT was developed to help.

 

UPOINT is a classification system to determine the specific diagnosis and treatment for male CPPS. The white boxes below represent the cause of symptoms, which in the case of CPPS, can be multiple. The higher the number of causes, the more severe the symptoms.  The gray boxes show the appropriate treatment options depending on the cause(s).1

 

 

A study of 100 men assessed and treated with the UPOINT system saw an 84% reduction in pain and disability. 2 CPPS can have multiple classifications including Psychosocial, Neurologic/Systemic and Tenderness of Skeletal Muscles.  These men healed with a combination of pelvic floor physical therapy, medication that targets nerves and talk therapy. By using the UPOINT system doctors can prevent the natural increased anxiety and pain escalation that these patients experience the longer they experience pain.  

Women with Endometriosis benefit by a team of providers

The BC Women’s Centre for Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to treat women with endometriosis which resulted in 45% of their patients feeling “much better” in regards to pain and quality of life. Twenty three percent (23%) reported feeing “somewhat better” and only 20% reported feeling the “same”. These results were seen at the completion and at the 1 year follow up of the program.3

 

What does this interdisciplinary approach look like?

BC’s approach included education in the recent science of pain – how the brain is involved in sending pain signals as a form of protecting the body and how the brain can be retrained to lower or stop sending those signals. BC clients received pelvic physical therapy which involved manual therapy to release adhesions of muscles, fascia & intestines and movement/exercise prescription. They were also assessed by a gynecologist, received counseling (stress management), nursing care management and  BC’s team would meet to discuss their patients to ensure great outcome.

Create Your Medical Team

Women may not have access to nor can afford an extensive program like BC’s, however they can use the same approach with their own care. An experienced pelvic physical therapist can be the liaison between the medical doctor and all other healthcare providers as we tend to spend dedicated 45 minutes to an hour of interrupted time with our patients.  Being open to explore other treatment options such as cognitive behavioral therapy, acupuncture and nutritional guidance as this can also lower symptoms of endometriosis.

 

 

Pelvic Physical Therapy helps Cervical Cancer Survivors

 After being diagnosed and successfully completing cervical cancer treatment, we learned that 66% of cervical cancer survivors suffer from urinary issues such as leaking. Thirty three (33)% percent have a “storage dysfunction” which means the bladder sends the “Gotta Go” signal when it is only a quarter or half full, making women go to the bathroom too many times a day. Fifty (50) % have voiding dysfunction, which means there is left over urine in the bladder or the time it takes to pee is markedly increased.4

Pelvic physical therapy is an accepted treatment option for these women. Gentle manual release of the lower abdominal, inner thigh and pelvic floor/perineal regions and pelvic floor muscle training using biofeedback can significantly improve urinary incontinence, sexual function and quality of life for women who survived cervical cancer. Progressive use of vaginal dilators can help promote optimal healing of vaginal tissues after radiation.5

We want all women to feel good and confident about their body after cancer treatments and are thrilled to see this research.

  1. Nickel JC. C. Paul Perry Memorial Lecture “Clinical Approach to Male CPPS”. 2016.
  2. Shoskes DA, Nickel JC, Kattan MW. Phenotypically directed multimodal therapy for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a prospective study using UPOINT. J Urol. 2010;75(6).
  3. Allaire C. Innovations in the Evaluation and Care of Women with Endometriosis. 2016.
  4. Katepratoom C, Manchana T, Amornwichet N. Lower urinary tract dysfunction and quality of life in cervical cancer survivors after concurrent chemoradiation versus radical hysterectomy. Int Urogyn J. 2014;5(1).
  5. Lyons M. Women, Cancer and Pelvic Pain. 2016.

 

 

 

Online Educational & Empowerment Course for Women Suffering with PGAD &/or Vulvodynia

therapy

A unique program designed for a small group of women (15) who suffer with PGAD and chronic vulvar pain.  From the comfort of your home, you’ll have the opportunity to connect with each other in a safe environment, using private encrypted meeting platform (Zoom.us) while learning evidence-based therapeutic solutions for both your physical and emotional healing process. Each class is 2 hours held every 2 weeks for a total of eight(8) classes over a four month time period.

Health care experts from the fields of physical therapy and social work will be teaching this one of a kind program: Evelyn Hecht, PT, ATC and Eva Margot Kant LCSW-R . Their combined 35 years of experience will help you learn effective self-help tools for your mind and body while connecting and supporting each other on your journey to health.

Evelyn Hecht, PT, ATC owner of EMH Physical Therapy has been treating women with pelvic pain and sexual dysfunction for 20 years. She and her team of Doctor of Physical Therapists will be teaching self-care techniques and exercises that can be easily implemented into your healing routine.   The DPT’s will will answer questions about physical symptoms and exercises to the best of their virtual ability.

Physical therapy topics will include

  • Breathing and Meditation
  • Symptom Tracking to identify triggers and solutions
  • Pelvic Floor stretching exercises
  • Neuroplasticity – break the pain cycle

Eva Margot Kant, LCSW-R is a compassionate sex/psychotherapist in private practice with 15 years counseling patients with chronic and sexual pain. She helps clients navigate life’s transitions, address fears and questions about chronic illness/pain.  As a group therapy facilitator, she has worked with organizations including the American Cancer Society and National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Eva teaches courses on sexuality at Columbia University Graduate School of Social Work.

Talk therapy topics will include:

  • Fear
  • Avoidance
  • Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR)
  • Educating the Clinician
  • Sharing Information to Loved Ones
  • Dating/Love Relationships

Additional Experts may be incorporated into the separate groups to share information and resources.

Course Details

Length of Online Group Class: 7PM to 9PM Eastern Standard Time

Start Date: Thursday January 19, 2017

2017 Class schedule:  1/19, 2/2, 2/16, 3/2, 3/16, 3/30, 4/13, 4/27

Number of Classes:  Eight (8) classes over a 4 month period January thru April 2017

Cost: Each two hour class is $40.00 per person.  You must register and pre pay for  all 8 classes, at a cost of $320 per person one week prior to the first class.  The price of attending one personal session with a counselor or physical therapist can range between $80 to $250 per hour, depending on where you live. This program offers you access to speak to and learn from a pelvic physical therapy professional with experience treating PGAD, vulvodynia and a clinical social worker seasoned in treating sexual issues and chronic pain for a total of 16 hours at a reduced rate of $320.

While Online Educational & Empowerment Course for Women with PGAD &/or Vulvodynia  does not substitute for individualized therapy, the evidence-based strategies, techniques and support you will gain without leaving the comfort of your home is a one of kind opportunity.

Online Educational & Empowerment Course for Women with PGAD &/or Vulvodynia welcomes a maximum of 15 attendees.

To Register: contact Cindy or Star at (212) 288-2242. Payment is accepted by check, no credit cards. Write check to “Evelyn Hecht, PT” in the amount of $320 and mail to following address:

Evelyn Hecht, PT,1317 Third Avenue,9th Floor, New York, NY 10021

Payment in full is due by January 12, 2017.

Space is limited, so please Sign Up Today

This course will only be conducted with a registration of 15 women.  If the course is cancelled, all monies will be refunded.

For additional questions, please email: info@emhphysicaltherapy.com or call  (212) 288-2242

 

 

A Pregnant Physical Therapist’s Top Tips for Your Healthy Pregnancy

Navigating the pregnancy literature on proper posture, exercise and sleeping alignment can be overwhelming and the guidelines presented are often not a “one size fits all”. Afterall, everyone’s pregnancy is unique. Below you will find some quick and easy tips that I utilized and found helpful throughout my pregnancy that kept me fit, aligned and pain free throughout my work day as a physical therapist at EMH.

Save

Save

Save