Painful sex? Check out our helpful tips about what you can do to help!

If you’re having pain during sex, try the following tips:

You should have a consult with a pelvic floor physical therapist for training on positioning and how to use a set of vaginal dilators:

They are used to stretch the vaginal tissue, facilitate pelvic muscle relaxation and prepare for intercourse.

If you are able to have penetrative sex:

  • Practice breathing techniques or stretching prior to intercourse
  • You may want to begin with clitoral stimulation to increase natural lubrication and vaginal expansion prior to insertion
  • You can use the dilator with your partner if you feel comfortable as a way to transition from medical to sexual use of dilator. This practice can help prepare you for engaging in sexual intercourse and help you both come to understand the challenge of the healing process and develop skills for working together as a team
  • The transition from plastic dilators to a partner’s penis is often an exciting step for a couple. To make the transition, your partner has to learn a passive role, letting you control the insertion and then just resting inside the vagina for a while. In time you can expand this exercise to permit insertion by the male of his own penis, clitoral stimulation, some thrusting and experimentation with different positions.
  • Use plenty of lubricant and use one that is water soluble
  • Apply ice or frozen blue gel pack wrapped in one layer of a hand towel to relieve burning after intercourse. Frozen peas or corn in a small sealed plastic bag mold comfortably to vulvar anatomy.

Keep in mind that intercourse isn’t always 100% comfortable. Temporary tugs and pressures are often just part of getting started. If some minor discomfort exists, try moving ahead anyway – but if obvious pain persists, don’t ignore it, stop. If you encounter unexpected difficulty, you may want to practice with the dilators some more before attempting intercourse again. Continued dilator use may be necessary from time to time, to keep the vaginal area relaxed and comfortable.

Hey Women! Let’s learn about your lady parts!

With women’s rights being a hot button issue recently, it got me thinking: how many women really know and explore the parts that make them a woman? (Disclaimer: I’m not forgetting those in the LGBQT community who have different anatomy and identify as a woman. You do you, girl!)

So ladies…What’s down there? Grab a mirror and play along.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Externally you will see three openings:

  1. The urethral opening which is closest to the front of your body (where we eliminate pee)
  2. The vaginal opening in the middle (where intercourse occurs and also the birth canal)
  3. The rectal opening below (where we eliminate poop)

The urethral and vaginal openings are housed in the first skin layer,        called labia majora (with pubic hair) and just underneath, the labia minora (hairless layer) that protect these openings.

Also protected by the labia just above the urethral opening is a small sensitive, nerve filled structure with two hidden “legs”  that surrounds either side of the vaginal opening called the Clitoris. The head of the clitoris is very sensitive and serves in sexual function for arousal when stimulated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The clitoris is considered the most erogenous zone on the female body.  Stimulation of the more than 8,000 nerve endings here can lead to the rhythmic, quick flick pelvic floor contractions that we interpret as pleasurable. Yes, I’m talking about orgasm!

Now that you are acquainted with the anatomy use a mirror to check your own lady parts. Then do some of the following movements:

  1. Try a Kegel: contract pelvic floor like you are stopping the flow of urine or don’t want to pass gas. You’ll  lifting of the pelvic area upwards
  2. Try a reverse kegel: bear down like trying to pass a bowel movement. You should see the pelvic area gently bulge outward
  3. Cough or laugh. You should observe an initial lifting up/in of the pelvic floor, with a quick relax back to normal position

 

Let’s take a look at the Pelvic Floor muscles.

In this image, the external skin is removed and you are now looking at the underlying muscles. These muscles are important stabilizers of the pelvis and serve many functions: bowel and bladder control, core stabilizers, involved with sexual function and support of bladder and other visceral organs.

You can check your pelvic muscles by inserting one clean finger into the vaginal opening to the level between 1st and 2nd knuckle. Assess your strength by squeezing the inserted finger (doing a kegel) by contracting your pelvic floor muscles.  You should feel a ring of tension around your finger and feel a gentle pull upwards toward your head.

Assess for tension in the muscles by stretching directly to the right, left, down and diagonally up/right, diagonally up/left, down/right, down/left. No need for direct upward pressure as this is where your urethra is located.  A healthy pelvic floor should feel no pain, only pressure or stretch.

I hope this helped you to feel more comfortable and aware of your female anatomy. In a study published in the International Journal of Sexual Health, scientists found that women who had a positive view of their genitals were more comfortable in their skin, more apt to orgasm, and more likely to experiment in bed. So go ahead and get to know your lady parts.

Remember:

A healthy female pelvic floor has

  • no pelvic pain or pain/tingling/feeling of pressure in the sexual organs,
  • painless intercourse and insertion of tampons,
  • the ability to stay relaxed and soft, not to be chronically tense, which leads to pelvic/back/hip pain,
  • ease of voiding (of pee and poop) with no issues of frequency, bladder pain, nor straining during every BM due to constipation
  • no leaking when lifting weights, laughing , sprinting for a bu

If you experience any symptoms, consult an experienced pelvic floor physical therapist for evaluation and guidance.